A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 45

I’m late posting (writing in general) this morning due to my having to search vectors for a logo to incorporate on a shirt for work. Why am I doing it from home? Because I’m BLOCKED from most sites. I’m even blocked from viewing images just to see if that’s what’s needed. But here we are at stanza 45:

Pocket Version

If thou a hast another, whom thou little
trustest, yet wouldst good from him
derive, thou shouldst speak him fair, but
think craftily, and repay treachery with lies.

This is a follow up not only to yesterday’s stanza but also to Stanza 42. I think that this stanza is advising that if you were to have a person that you call a friend but not one that you fully trust or even call to confide the most embarrassing or difficult situations in, it’s ok to still be friends and to speak nicely of them. Don’t talk about them behind their back and keep the knowledge of their true self you yourself. Think before speaking with them. If they have done you wrong in some form or another, the next time you speak with them, don’t tell them the truth in anything about what is going on with yourself. ‘How’re things going at work?’ Instead of me telling them that it’s a toxic place I would simply reply, ‘Things are good. What’s new with you?’ If I were to tell them what was truly happening that could come back and bite me in the ass. Another lesson for the kiddies.

Happy Tuesday Y’all!

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 17

The snow is moving in according to the news but since I wasn’t snowed in this morning I do have to go to work. I have to do the adulting today. This morning I feel like I’m bashing my head against the ceiling trying to break through (either with art, writing, job search etc…) but nothing is happening. I’m going to start with my stanza then move to other things including going to work.

Chisholm:

The fool gapes when among the folk.
He mutters and mopes,
and soon it is seen, when he gets drunk,
what his mind is like.

Pocket Version:

A fool gapes when to a house he comes,
to himself mutters or is silent; but all at
once, if he gets drink, then is the man’s
mind displayed.

From what I have read lines 1 and 2 vary differently from one translation to another. Lines 3 and 4 remind me of the previous stanzas speaking of drinking and losing wits. Where do I sit with this? I feel that I am the ‘awkward’ person at a gathering or with friends that mutters out of shyness. If I am able to have a glass of wine, mead, beer, I’m able to speak up and act like a normal person. As long as I keep in mind that I’m drinking I don’t lose my wit and only open up enough that I don’t look stupid in the end. This also tells me that a sober person’s mind is different from the same person’s under the influence mind (and is more truthful than sober person).

Happy Tuesday everyone!

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 14

Here I am going over stanza 14 the last one from 10-14 that gives advice on losing our ability to think clearly when we’ve had too much to drink. The real reason I don’t drink as much is simple.

A friend visited me from Alaska and we went to a local tavern for a game of pool and drinks. My husband was on standby and would pick us up if need be. We were playing pool and only ordered our first drink (mine being a whiskey and coke-usual).  A group of snowmobilers had come through and were putting quarters on our table for next game. I HAD my drink in my hand! Please remember that. I was watching her shoot, drink in hand and took a sip from my full glass. She gave me the cue, took a swig of her drink and when I looked up she was spinning. Everything was spinning and moving. She was the one that had kept us both calm, grabbed my arm and said, ‘We have to get out of here NOW!’ We made it home and I got violently sick and passed out. My husband got scared and took both of us to ER where we learned that we had both been slipped GHB in our drinks. So no, I don’t drink a lot and now not only is my drink in my hand but I can see it at all times. I don’t want to ever be in a situation where I lose my wits or have a loose tongue because of drinking.

Hollander:

Drunk I became, dead drunk, forsooth,
when I was with wise Fjalar;
That bout is best from which back fetches
each man his mind full clear.

Pocket Havamal

Drunk I was, I was over-drunk, at that
cunning Fialar’s. It’s the best drunkenness,
when everyone after it regains his reason.

First reading this I thought Odin to be boastful about getting drunk and it was fine because he regained his composure. Well, everyone regains composure after a good greasy meal and some sleep. But thanks to TOOHG (yup gave it letters instead of typing it out) they broke it down like the best sort of drinking is enjoying yourself but not to the point of becoming a drunken fool. As for Fialar that’s for another time.

Happy Tuesday Y’all!

 

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 12

Although my stanza study of the Havamal isn’t daily it’s something I CANNOT just walk away from. I’m so proud of the people that are dedicating their time to their belief and religion of choice as I read about their journeys daily. It’s an inspiration into devotion. But it just doesn’t limit someone to religion or beliefs. It can be art, writing, photography, whatever it is it’s still an inspiration into doing something daily that brings happiness. Kudos Y’all!  Today  I’m on stanza 12. Reminder, stanzas 10-14 all seem to go together.

Hollander:

For good it is not, though good it is thought,
mead for the sons of men;
the deeper he drinks the dimmer grows
the mind of many a man.

Pocket Havamal (what I carry with me)

A worse provision no man can
take from than too much beer-bibbing;
for the more he drinks the less control
he has of his own mind.

Again, keep a sharp mind when out and about. Don’t partake too much in the mead and keep your wits about you. Alcohol diminishes the ability to make good choices. Odin has great advice.

 

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 11

This morning I woke up late so things are going to be kind of short. I’m at stanza 11 of my Havamal. According to the Temple of Our Heathen Gods, stanzas 10-14 are kind of linked together. I like Chisholm’s version for this one.

Chisholm:

A man bears no better burden,
when on the wilderness ways
than great wisdom. One can have no worse fare,
on road or field, than too much ale.

Pocket Version:

A worse provision on the way he can-
not carry than too much beer-bibbing; so
good is not, as it is said, beer for the sons
of men.

The first two lines are reminiscent of the lines from stanza 10 but the next lines are telling me that too much drink will not be as easy to carry. It also dulls the senses of being cautious, aware, and keeping your wits about you. I’m a social drinker meaning even at Sumbels or fires with the Kindred I only have a glass of mead outside of drinking from the horn. Whereas others are not in the same mind frame and that’s ok too. Another stanza reminding me to keep cautious, aware, and wits about.

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 10

I have to say yesterday was an ‘I’m going to smack the kid for acting entitled’ sort of day. I was able to control my emotions and just do my job. I still wanted to smack him though. With that being said during the Kindred’s book club meeting we were talking about traits of a heathen and being able to control your own emotions. That is something I’m definitely going to have to work on as my facial expressions are a dead give away. Here we are Stanza 10 still in the hospitality section of the Havamal. I’m going to change things up a bit and use Terry’s translation thanks to the Temple of Our Heathen Gods. It just seems easier for me to read.

Terry:
If a man takes with him a mind full of sense
he can carry nothing better;
riches like this on a stranger’s road
will do more good than gold.

My Pocket Havamal Translation:
A better burden no man bears on the
road than much good sense; that is thought
better than riches in a strange place; such is
the recourse of the indigent.

What better thing to have with you is Wisdom? When you’re packing for a long trip or preparing yourself to even go out to the grocery store you are already preparing with the wisdom you have without even knowing it. The grocery list or umbrella because it’s going to rain later. Or how about an emergency kit in the car that includes blanket and salt because the state you’re traveling to is expecting snow? Or what about when you are there and you are needing provisions or directions or hell you get turned around. Deep inside you, there is the knowledge that you tap into and get to what, who, or where is needed. By far this is one of my favorite stanzas. On a side note, I would love to visit Externsteine in Germany. I found a small article about this place and if any of my readers could guide me into finding more information about the towns surrounding it and pictures that would be greatly appreciated. Happy Tuesday everyone!

 

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 9

The book club went awesome last night and we had a great discussion. It was like a renewable force for the path I’ve chosen. It seems like with the schedule I have that Monday-Wednesdays are great days for me to go through my Havamal. Here we are at Stanza 9 still in theGestaþáttr, the “guest’s section”.

Hollander:
Happy is he who hath won him
both winning ways and wisdom;
for ill it is oft who asketh help
from the wit and words of another.

Pocket Translation:
He is happy, who in himself possesses
fame and wit while living; for bad
counsels have oft been received
from another’s heart.

Oh, this is a good one. It’s much like stanza 8 but it I think it’s also warning about being cautious from advice (warranted or not) from other people.

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 6

With the holiday season is finally wrapping up I can get back into my personal growth project. Part of learning Asatru and Heathenism is learning, reading, and practicing. The problem is I can read and understand most everything I read. It’s my memory-retaining the information and I think that’s going to be my downfall. If I’m accepted into the kindred as an official member I have to be able to sit down one on one and talk to them about the reading material. Well…FML! I’ll do my best.

So far I have been sharing with you my stanzas that have covered being cautious, a good host, and being a good guest. I’m sitting here with muffins in the oven (early because we have adult things to do today) and coffee. Dedication is something that I’m working on and it’s better when it’s quiet in the house.

Stanza 6 Terry Translation
Better to be careful than to boast
how much is in your mind;
when the wise come in, keeping their counsel,
trouble seldom starts.
A man won’t find a better friend
than his own head full of sense.

Pocket Translation
Of his understanding, no one should
be proud, but rather in conduct cautious.
When the prudent and taciturn come
a dwelling, harm seldom befalls the
cautious; for a firmer friend no man ever gets
that great discernment.

This seems like a LOT to take in. Thanks to previous translations and research it’s a bit easier to swallow. Since we are in the ‘hospitality’ section of the Havamal I think this is also a good stanza of advice. It’s better to not talk too much about yourself, your knowledge, criticize someone’s views, talk down about how something is done. Don’t be rude and prideful-it can make for an awkward situation. When you are a guest me mindful of how you speak. You won’t really start trouble or offend if you’re talking out your ass. ‘Sit down, shut up, and observe’ is a nice clear and precise to the point answer.

I learned that during sumbels there is a time for a person to boast specifically about themselves…I just wish I had something to boast about. There is one woman that shows up to the sumbels and rituals but never brings much but herself and her obnoxious boasting speech. After reading this all I can think about is her.

From Yule to Medieval Times

These past few days have been emotional and great all at the same time. I celebrated and experienced (somewhat) my first Yule with the kindred. I was still sick with the stomach bug but made it through the Sumbels and ritual. During this time my husband and I are trying to find each other again and that is proving to be a longer goal that I once thought. Over a decade of being together, you start to feel like strangers all over again. Christmas Eve, I surprised everyone with a trip to Medieval Times. The only way that we could pull that one off was an online discount, then another at check-in for a better upgrade, and not staying at a hotel which meant driving a total of 8 hours. As your kids get older that holiday sparkle fades in their eyes. The best gift I got was seeing that sparkle come alive again in their eyes as they watched the entertainment.

From Yule to Medieval Times (Friday-Monday), we were going non-stop. Then comes Christmas day when my mom decided to invite her and her boyfriend over. I hadn’t planned much for dinner and ended up throwing something together for 7 people, in an hour. Being sick and tired from driving I didn’t want anything to do with the kitchen. Next year I think we will do a longer Yule celebration since there is some debate on the holiday lasting 3 days or 12 days.

Today, since we didn’t get to do our family games like tradition thanks to family stopping by, I’m ordering pizza and we are doing a gauntlet of games. We will be playing Cards against humanity, exploding kittens, Stranger Things monopoly edition, and some classic Nintendo 2 player game battles. This weekend I have plans for more Havamal study since I learned so much during Yule. I have some wood burning to do and other things to set up my area. Pictures and whatnot of my progress will surely make a debut here. I’m slowly feeling like myself after the huge interview fail and working even harder on my web development course. Maybe marketing graphic design isn’t for me. All the great advice, positive words, and stories from my readers helped in more ways than one. Thank you, guys.

How was your holiday? Traditions new and old? Happy Wednesday everyone!

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 4

Another late night last night but talking with my son was worth it until the conversation turned into Sharknados and zombies. I was like,’ Dude, you’re stalling. Go to bed. Mommy loves you.’ He grinned knowing he was busted and took off to his room.  Yesterday according to my Asatru calendar was Feast of Sunna is a national holiday in Sweden. My daughter doesn’t follow the Norse beliefs so she wasn’t going to serve coffee and cake with a crown of candles and I’m ok with that. I think I wouldn’t do it either in fear of wax burning my scalp.  Today is Tulya’s E’en opens to the Norse Merry Month. Seven days before Yule, all the trolls are released from the underground. This is also the season when Odin and the wild hunt ride. Householders protect their farms by saining (blessing) them with the sign of the hammer, and fire is carried through all the buildings. I have a hammer hanging in my living room from my woodburning trial and error and even though I’m not going to carry a big ol’ torch through the house I will with a candle.

Here we are, Friday, and Stanza 4.

Hollander Translation:
A drink needeth to full dishes who cometh,
a towel, and the prayer to partake;
good bearing eke, to be well liked
and be bidden to banquet again.

Pocket Version: 
Water to him is needful for
refection comes, a towel and hospitable
invitation, a good reception; if he can get it,
discourse and answer.

Oh boy, this one is a lot to swallow. What helped me understanding this stanza, thanks to Temple of Our Heathen Gods,

Guests do not get an automatic pass (just as hosts do not get an automatic pass). When the guest enters the hall, he is implored in Stanza 1 to look about and make sure no foes are present. In Stanza 2 we see this idea that the guest is placed near the fire and “pressed” or tested. Questions are asked. The guest is measured and his or her worthiness judged. And in Stanza 4, we see that if the guest has earned it…he or she should get fair fame and conversation should be shared with him or her.

Another point that has been mentioned to me in the past, is something very easily missed. The stanza makes it clear that our ancestors valued cleanliness, at a time in history when cleanliness was not at the top of every culture’s list of values.

How about that to every guest be cautious and to every host be just as aware. As a host be hospitable and as a guest be grateful and generous as well.

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 3

It was a crazy morning by my own design of course. I past out early last night that left me up and awake until 1 am which surprise surprise, I overslept. I made a half ass attempt at a decent lunch with a resulted wrap that could have used some help. But it was food and I was starving.

Work, on the other hand, was something strange for me. It was exactly what I expected when I was first hired. I actually get to do the job that I was hired to do and not to sit in the art room and collect dust. Who would have thought that the person that hired me was the reason why I was negative or the reason why I wasn’t allowed to do ANY marketing? Long story short (I’m going to give a try for being a southern girl), we had our first marketing meeting without my hiring manager there (the one that dipped on doing any marketing) and my ideas were well received! Not only that, when I started speaking about stats and campaigns and how it would cost them little to nothing it was like a light bulb went on for them. They just learned of the gem that they’ve had sitting being useless. Great meeting and I was in a great mood for the rest of the day.

I’m tired but really want to understand the Hávamál (words to live by and advice) and I’m not going to do that by just sitting here. I’m currently eating a Weight Watcher’s approved TV dinner and doing some research.

Stanza 3 (Hollander Translation):

The warmth seeketh who hath wandered long
and is numb about the knees;
meat and dry clothes the man needeth
over the fells who hath fared.

Pocker Version:

Fire is needful to him who is come in,
and whose knees are frozen; food and raiment
a man requires, wheo’er the fell has travelled.

First off my grammar program is having a fit over this and it’s kind of funny. Second…huh? But after breaking it down…hun this is what I was raised on. Southern Hospitality. But for this, it’s hospitality at its best. I was always taught to make enough food for an extra person in case one should just show up out of the blue. It’s a habit that has stuck with me. This is saying a guest shows up and needs shelter, food, warmth and comfortable clothing. Unfortunately, I think this has fallen to the wayside quite a bit this day and age but I noticed small things that my kids do that is leading them down the right path.

So from this stanza, I take away being a great hospitable host to guests that may stop by.

 

 

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 2

I am acquiring books upon books about Norse myths, Asatru, and even geography. What I learned this morning is that the Hávamál is broken into sections: Gestaþáttr (guests section), Loddfáfnismál (from what I understand this covers more on morals and ethics and code of conduct, Rúnatal (Odin reveals secrets of the Runes), and finally Ljóðatal (from what I gather thanks to Temple of Out Heathen Gods, is about Odin speaking of his sacrifice (which he did to gain knowledge among other things). Ok, I know that there are some of you rolling your eyes but understand that what you are thinking about my path, at one time I thought about yours. This is where tolerance and acceptance is practiced OR read something else. It’s that simple guys. Moving on, Stanza 2 (Hollander translation):

2. All hail to the givers! A guest hath come
say where shall he sit?
In haste is he to the hall who cometh
to find a place by the fire.

Pocket Version 2:
Givers, hail! A guest is come in: where shall he sit? In much haste is he, who on the ways has to try his luck.

There is some controversy over the meaning of this stanza. Some translators believe that it’s a warning for the host to be wary of the guest coming to visit meaning harm. Some believe (which I lean towards more) is that the guest is needing to get warm from the elements. I can see both sides of the translator’s thoughts since the first stanza warned us to be wary of the people we are visiting. So shouldn’t we watch carefully the guest coming to our home as well?

When I do try to make friends upon meeting them the first time I’m pleasant while introducing myself. Over several times meeting or talking I’m paying attention to their mannerisms, how this person treats others or interacts with their family. If I’m not comfortable with something we become acquaintances. It’s that simple or that’s how I understand this stanza.

This will give me a little something to think about today if I meet people. Happy Wednesday everyone and I would like to say hello to my readers in Poland and Sweden (I seen Y’all on my stats map…AWESOME).

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 1

I gained a little bit of confidence after reading so many people posting their favorite scriptures or what moves them or that is helping them through hard times. I own a pocket Hávamál but have never REALLY studied the words or applied a meaning. If you would like to learn more about what the Hávamál I’ve provided a clickable starting point. There is so much information and research into the origins of these words that it can be a study in that of itself. I’m going to start with the first stanza and go from there. There are different translations but I prefer Snorri’s.

1.
At every door-way,
ere one enters,
one should spy round,
one should pry round
for uncertain is the witting
that there be no foeman sitting,
within, before one on the floor

 

 

(pocket version)

  1. All door-ways, before going forward should be looked to; for difficult it is to know where foes may sit within the dwelling.

What does this mean to me? Well, I guess it’s something that I already practice. I am aware of my surroundings where ever I am. I learned and I’m sure you’ve experienced this as well, a friendship that is fake. If allowed it can do more harm than good either physically or mentally or both. Be careful where and who you keep company.

Quote Challenge Day 1: Havamal Inspiration

I think this is a great challenge and a way for people to share a quote that is inspiring to them in some way that’s special and dear to them. It’s like a story into the encouragement for one’s soul. Thank you Grateful Single Mom for nominating me to participate in this challenge. The writing and wit of her blog will definitely give you an encouraging boost and a little humor along the way. So, stop over and see her quote choices that inspire her as well. It’s a great mental break from the A to Z challenge (and getting over being sick).

Rules:

  1. Thank the person who nominated you.
  2. Post a quote for three consecutive days (1 quote for each day).
  3. Share why this quote appeals so much to you
  4. Nominate 3 different bloggers for each day.

Never walk away from home
ahead of your axe and sword.
You can’t feel a battle
in your bones
or foresee a fight.

Hávámal, The Sayings Of Odin

No, I don’t have a sword or an axe that I carry around. But when I do leave home, I’m aware and cautious at all times because of past experiences. This helps as a reminder to trust my instincts. Most of the time they aren’t ever wrong. This could be interrupting a man harassing a young woman at her first job. The poor young girl just landed her first after school job at the mall. I passed once and I seen a pleading look of, ‘Help me,’ on her face. It was one that I have worn many times. I didn’t need to know about the hydro whatever that she was supposed to sell but I stopped and her this man’s pickup lines. He was twice her age. I interrupted and stood between him and her. The protective mother instinct kicked in. Before I knew it, this man decided that he was going to confront me. My husband stepped, security was called and I made sure the guards walked her to her car after her shift.

So please, remember to trust your instincts in all things. I don’t mean just for safety but in all things.


The three bloggers I nominate are (Y’all have fun with this):

  1. Tales From the Mind of Kristian
  2. The Ministry of Shrawley Walks
  3. Revenge of Eve

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