A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 29

Today is Monday and I did a little extra self-care and I’m in a great mood. Although my husband walking through this morning sounding like a cross between Chewbacca and Vader with his cold did make me cringe. I’m trying to get back to my schedule and I think this week may let me as there isn’t so much planned (that I’m aware of). This morning I’m going to start where I left off at bringing me to stanza 29.

Pocket Version:
He utters too many futile words who
is never silent; a garrulous tongue, if it be
not checked, sings often to its own harm.

Chisholm:
He who never shuts up
blathers powerless staves.
The speedy tongue that never stops
often brings itself harm.

I like Chisholm’s version because the translation is a little easier to understand than my pocket version. Well, at least quicker. This stanza seems to continue with know when to be quiet during conversations and speak when your knowledge of a subject is a bit better. It’s ok to carry on full conversations and learn but careful what you ramble. Those words could possibly come back to bite you in the butt. I’ll remember that today but I’m also going to remember to stay positive.

Happy Monday Y’all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 4

Another late night last night but talking with my son was worth it until the conversation turned into Sharknados and zombies. I was like,’ Dude, you’re stalling. Go to bed. Mommy loves you.’ He grinned knowing he was busted and took off to his room.  Yesterday according to my Asatru calendar was Feast of Sunna is a national holiday in Sweden. My daughter doesn’t follow the Norse beliefs so she wasn’t going to serve coffee and cake with a crown of candles and I’m ok with that. I think I wouldn’t do it either in fear of wax burning my scalp.  Today is Tulya’s E’en opens to the Norse Merry Month. Seven days before Yule, all the trolls are released from the underground. This is also the season when Odin and the wild hunt ride. Householders protect their farms by saining (blessing) them with the sign of the hammer, and fire is carried through all the buildings. I have a hammer hanging in my living room from my woodburning trial and error and even though I’m not going to carry a big ol’ torch through the house I will with a candle.

Here we are, Friday, and Stanza 4.

Hollander Translation:
A drink needeth to full dishes who cometh,
a towel, and the prayer to partake;
good bearing eke, to be well liked
and be bidden to banquet again.

Pocket Version: 
Water to him is needful for
refection comes, a towel and hospitable
invitation, a good reception; if he can get it,
discourse and answer.

Oh boy, this one is a lot to swallow. What helped me understanding this stanza, thanks to Temple of Our Heathen Gods,

Guests do not get an automatic pass (just as hosts do not get an automatic pass). When the guest enters the hall, he is implored in Stanza 1 to look about and make sure no foes are present. In Stanza 2 we see this idea that the guest is placed near the fire and “pressed” or tested. Questions are asked. The guest is measured and his or her worthiness judged. And in Stanza 4, we see that if the guest has earned it…he or she should get fair fame and conversation should be shared with him or her.

Another point that has been mentioned to me in the past, is something very easily missed. The stanza makes it clear that our ancestors valued cleanliness, at a time in history when cleanliness was not at the top of every culture’s list of values.

How about that to every guest be cautious and to every host be just as aware. As a host be hospitable and as a guest be grateful and generous as well.

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 2

I am acquiring books upon books about Norse myths, Asatru, and even geography. What I learned this morning is that the Hávamál is broken into sections: Gestaþáttr (guests section), Loddfáfnismál (from what I understand this covers more on morals and ethics and code of conduct, Rúnatal (Odin reveals secrets of the Runes), and finally Ljóðatal (from what I gather thanks to Temple of Out Heathen Gods, is about Odin speaking of his sacrifice (which he did to gain knowledge among other things). Ok, I know that there are some of you rolling your eyes but understand that what you are thinking about my path, at one time I thought about yours. This is where tolerance and acceptance is practiced OR read something else. It’s that simple guys. Moving on, Stanza 2 (Hollander translation):

2. All hail to the givers! A guest hath come
say where shall he sit?
In haste is he to the hall who cometh
to find a place by the fire.

Pocket Version 2:
Givers, hail! A guest is come in: where shall he sit? In much haste is he, who on the ways has to try his luck.

There is some controversy over the meaning of this stanza. Some translators believe that it’s a warning for the host to be wary of the guest coming to visit meaning harm. Some believe (which I lean towards more) is that the guest is needing to get warm from the elements. I can see both sides of the translator’s thoughts since the first stanza warned us to be wary of the people we are visiting. So shouldn’t we watch carefully the guest coming to our home as well?

When I do try to make friends upon meeting them the first time I’m pleasant while introducing myself. Over several times meeting or talking I’m paying attention to their mannerisms, how this person treats others or interacts with their family. If I’m not comfortable with something we become acquaintances. It’s that simple or that’s how I understand this stanza.

This will give me a little something to think about today if I meet people. Happy Wednesday everyone and I would like to say hello to my readers in Poland and Sweden (I seen Y’all on my stats map…AWESOME).

A Quick Daily Study: Stanza 1

I gained a little bit of confidence after reading so many people posting their favorite scriptures or what moves them or that is helping them through hard times. I own a pocket Hávamál but have never REALLY studied the words or applied a meaning. If you would like to learn more about what the Hávamál I’ve provided a clickable starting point. There is so much information and research into the origins of these words that it can be a study in that of itself. I’m going to start with the first stanza and go from there. There are different translations but I prefer Snorri’s.

1.
At every door-way,
ere one enters,
one should spy round,
one should pry round
for uncertain is the witting
that there be no foeman sitting,
within, before one on the floor

 

 

(pocket version)

  1. All door-ways, before going forward should be looked to; for difficult it is to know where foes may sit within the dwelling.

What does this mean to me? Well, I guess it’s something that I already practice. I am aware of my surroundings where ever I am. I learned and I’m sure you’ve experienced this as well, a friendship that is fake. If allowed it can do more harm than good either physically or mentally or both. Be careful where and who you keep company.

What Am I?

I had to take 1/2 day off from work. Some people take off work because it’s warm and sunny but not me. Today is a beautiful fall day with graying skies and leaves starting to turn and some even falling from their branches. I told them, I didn’t ask. I drove around enjoying the crisp air and the complementary color of the land and sky. It’s so beautiful. I came home, cleaned the house, walked, made my coffee and here I sit. I wanted to share what is happening here on a personal level. Nothing is more personal than a person’s faith or beliefs.

I’m exploring my faith with Asatru and decided that something that would help in my decision of beliefs would be a DNA test. Silly? At first, I thought so but realized I didn’t know, or the entire family for that matter didn’t know what my father was. Was he of Native American? Was he Polish? Come to find out he was something that even my mother got upset about.

regional mapBefore I go any further, I grew up being told that I was Irish, Belgium, and Norwegian descent on my mother’s side and that my father was more than likely Native American and Polish (according to family rumors). I ordered tests for both my husband and myself and learned that there was nothing of what the rumors believed to be present in my DNA nor was their as much as my mother would claim of her descent. Come to find out Scottish, Swedish, and Norwegian make up the majority of my DNA. 56% Scottish! Really? Where did this come from? 20% Swedish? Wow, ok. Then there is the Norwegian. I couldn’t be more thrilled to learn my DNA ancestry. I only wish it would solve the puzzle of who my grandfather was. My dad was adopted and his father’s identity has literally been taken to the grave with everyone in the family.

I will go further with my Asatru educational journey but also want to learn and embrace my new found DNA ancestry. I would give ANYTHING to be able to visit Scotland and Norway but with a young family and all the financial support that is needed for that makes it seem like a possible bucket list item that in reality, I may never get to check off my list. I’ll do my best with what I have and research and maybe, possibly, reach out and find a network of individuals that could share a bit of their heritage with me. Whether it be recipes, pictures, beliefs, legends…whatever it may be I’m open to learning. If you can help out I would greatly appreciate it. There is nothing more valuable than knowing who or what you are.

Off to start some thumbnail sketches for my next 30 day Inktober project. I kind of failed at my last one but I was sidetracked by Asatru, weight loss, and family.

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